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Providential Dynamics

Tudor

Tudor (Photo credit: TBoard)

Yesterday, I saw an advertisement for a self help program. The tag line begged to ask the question, “What is the number one reason your dreams are failing you?”  

To me, this is a rather bizarre question, but I know what the program is probably getting at. So, I’ve decided to throw in my two cents on the subject.

Assuming you are an adult, at any given moment in time, you are exactly where you’ve lead yourself. You are exactly where and what you’ve always wanted. You are the fulfillment of your own dreams and aspirations. Even if you think this is not the case in your own life, it is you, and only you, who shifts the gears and steers the wheels toward your own destiny.

You are exactly where and what you’ve always wanted. You are the fulfillment of your own dreams and aspirations. The Cosmos will bend over backwards to get you what you’re asking for. Unfortunately, such providence is not in the rack of candy bars beside the checkout counter at the grocery store. The Cosmos is not set up for instant gratification. There tends to be a delay in the process. If your dreams are failing you, it’s probably because you’ve outgrown the ones that got you where you are today, replaced by new dreams and aspirations.

I should point out here that dreams and aspirations are not fulfilled from the thoughts of the conscious mind, which tends to be impetuous and hedonistic. Dreams and aspirations are fulfilled from the thoughts of the subconscious mind, which tends to concern its self with the survival and continuity of its mechanism. Your conscious desire to be a multi – millionaire may not be congruent with your subconscious desire to keep a consistent flow of food on the table.  The good news is, your pragmatic subconscious mind gets its view of the World from your impetuous conscious mind.

Lets examine this dynamic on a superficial level.

Lets say you have a thing for Tudor cottages. You think Tudor cottages are simply the coolest style of house in which a person could live. You want to build a Tudor cottage for yourself, and go live in it. You start gathering Tudor cottage blueprints, Tudor cottage wood, Tudor cottage nails, Tudor cottage sinks and Tudor cottage toilets. You marshal all your Tudor cottage stuff out to a spot in the woods, and start building yourself a Tudor cottage. You measure twice, cut once. line things up, and nail them together in Tudor cottage fashion. You are going to have yourself a Tudor cottage.

Somewhere along the process, you see a ranch style house … level, long, sleek, no stairs to climb. You start thinking how cool it would be to live in a house like that. Your tastes have evolved. You have a new dream, a new desire, a new aspiration. However, you can’t just stop working on your Tudor cottage, tear it down, and start building a ranch house. You have a lot of time, energy, and resources tied up in this Tudor cottage. All the stuff you have lined up for building a house is Tudor cottage stuff, not ranch house stuff. You then drudge through finishing your Tudor cottage to get a roof over your head.

Your dreams of building and living in a ranch style home did not fail you. They simply evolved away from your dreams of building and living in the Tudor cottage you already have in progress. However, if you keep the dream alive, you will more than likely build yourself and live in a ranch style home.

Hopefully, I won’t wait another two years to post an article on this blog. However, till next time, remember, you are spectacular, so dream big, and dream often.

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Dream a Little Dream

A while back, the blower on my old van wore out. I’m one of those old guys that don’t like to spend money unless he has to. I just let it go, as I really didn’t need it replaced at the time. However, winter is coming on out here in Nebraska, where one will often go outside to find a quarter-inch of ice on their windshield during the winter months. There is a need to have hot air blowing on ones windshield out here during winter, and, subsequently, and operating blower.

I’m not going to put a new blower in a twenty-one year old van. There’s a junk yard out here in a little town called Utica which seems to have just about any spare part for any vehicle a person would drive. Utica is about 25 miles West, and another 10 miles or so North of where I sit. So, off I went to secure myself another blower for the van.

The most efficient way to get to Utica from where I live is to get up on the interstate, and exit at another little town called Gohner. Gohner has all of 192 people living in it. Nebraska tends to be pock-marked with micro townships all over the place. Anyhow, one needs to get off at Gohner, drive a few more miles North, then West again several miles till one makes it to Utica.

I hadn’t been out that way for three, or four years, so I was really enjoying the view. Where I live, the land sort of roles in long, lumbering hills that one often can’t even tell they’re going up unless they’re on a bicycle. Out there toward Gohner, and Utica, the land gets flat as a pancake, and one can see trees balancing all the way out on the edge of the horizon.

I’m driving along, taking in the landscape, when the Gohner exit comes up on me, and I need to get off the interstate, and get on a regular state road. Just off the interstate, on the outskirts of the little town of Gohner, someone had constructed a frontier village. The village wasn’t very accurate historically for the area, as the buildings were made of logs, and not sod. I’m guessing sod is pretty hard to come by these days, so logs must have had to suffice. Anyhow, there was a livery stable, a saloon, a general store, all set up for tourist to stop in and recreate, including what appeared to be a frontierish looking playground for the kids.

Sadly, the project must not have worked out for the projector. Leaning up against the fence lining the frontier village was a large piece of plywood. Painted neatly in large letters on that piece of plywood leaning up against that fence were the words, ‘A dream died here.’

Seeing this sign didn’t ruin the rest of my jaunt, but it did make me feel sorry for whatever entities put this project together. There is something I may never have the opportunity to tell them, but I am going to take this opportunity to tell you. Dreams don’t die, they get abandoned. They may run into all kinds of problems, and setbacks, and oppositions, but they do not die. They get abandoned along the side of the interstate like a dog your landlord tells you you’re not allowed to have in the apartment.

Dreams don’t die. They are composed of thought energy, and sort of bounce around the Cosmos like radio waves. Leonardo da Vinci dreamt of a flying machine, but it didn’t come into fruition till a couple of hundred years later … others along the way picked up on the dream, and did what they could with it. Thomas Edison dreamt of illuminating the night, and he picked at it till it happened.

The idea that dreams die is defeatist. If you have a dream you can’t get put together, someone else will pick it up, and run with it. Go get another dream, and see how far you can take it.

You’re spectacular, dynamic. Stay that way. Get a dream, and work it.